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Chemistry
PERIODIC TABLE

Your periodic table is your friend!  I designed this downloadable PDF version especially for you to help you recognize patterns so you can better understand WHY trends exist on the table and HOW atoms participate in bonding.  

If you'd like individual support for your high school, AP, or college course, click here .

The periodic table organizes elements based on their properties and dates back to ancient times.  However, Dmitri Mendeleev is often credited with the first recognizable periodic table. In 1869, he arranged the known elements based on increasing atomic mass, grouping them by similar chemical properties and leaving gaps for undiscovered elements. This arrangement allowed him to predict the properties of elements yet to be discovered. Henry Moseley's work in the early 20th century, linking elements' properties to their atomic number (the number of protons), solidified the modern periodic table. It's important to realize that the table is not a static arrangement. It is a dynamic tool that continues to evolve as new elements are discovered and our understanding of atomic properties deepens.  I always say that your periodic table is the best “cheat sheet” you will ever have, because there is sooooo much information there for you if you know how to read it properly.

I WANT TO BE A PERIOIDC TABLE PRO

 

Periodicity

Periodicity refers to the repeating patterns of chemical and physical properties observed when elements are arranged in order of increasing atomic number.  The modern periodic table is organized into periods (horizontal rows) and groups (vertical columns), and trends emerge as one moves across a period or down a group.  As one moves across a period from left to right, the atomic number increases, and electrons are added to the outer energy level. Elements within the same period have the same number of electron shells.  However, as one progresses from left to right within a group, there is an increasing positive charge in the nucleus, which attracts the electrons more strongly. The outermost electrons, known as valence electrons, play a crucial role in determining an element's chemical properties. Elements in the same column or group have the same number of valence electrons and therefore often exhibit similar chemical behavior. 

Families on The Periodic Table

Columns on the periodic table, also known as groups or families, are arranged based on similarities in the electronic configurations of their atoms. There are 18 groups in total, labeled from 1 to 18.  Elements within the same group share the same number of valence electrons, which are the electrons in the outermost energy level.  These electrons influence how atoms interact with each other to form compounds.

The first two columns on the left side of the periodic table consist of the alkali metals (Group 1) and the alkaline earth metals (Group 2). These elements have one or two valence electrons, respectively. Moving to the right, one encounters the transition metals, which occupy the central part of the table and have variable valence electrons.  Columns 13 to 18 on the right side of the periodic table include the p-block elements. These groups include the metalloids, nonmetals, and noble gases. Group 17, also known as the halogens, contains elements with seven valence electrons, while Group 18 consists of the noble gases, which have full outer electron shells and are generally unreactive.  The organization of elements into groups facilitates the understanding of their chemical behavior. Elements within the same group often exhibit similar chemical properties because they share similar outer electron configurations. For instance, alkali metals in Group 1 are highly reactive and tend to form +1 cations, while halogens in Group 17 are reactive nonmetals that tend to form -1 anions.  This consistency in valence electron behavior within groups allows for a clear pattern of ion formation across the periodic table.

 

Electron Shielding Explained

Electron shielding is a concept in chemistry that describes the phenomenon where inner electrons partially shield or screen the outer electrons from the full force of the positive charge in the nucleus. Electrons exist in different energy levels or shells around an atomic nucleus. Inner shells are closer to the nucleus and are filled with electrons before the outer shells. Because electrons are negatively charged, they repel each other. As a result, the inner electrons create a shield or screening effect for the outer electrons. This shield weakens the attractive force between the positively charged protons in the nucleus and the negatively charged outer electrons. Therefore, the outer electrons experience a net effective nuclear charge that is less than the actual charge of the nucleus.

What is Effective Nuclear Charge

 Effective nuclear charge refers to the net positive charge experienced by an electron in an atom, taking into account both the attractive force of the positively charged protons in the nucleus and the repulsive forces from other electrons.  As one moves across a period from left to right, the effective nuclear charge generally increases because the number of protons in the nucleus increases.  The additional electrons in the same energy level provide some shielding, but the increasing positive charge has a stronger pull on the outer electrons, resulting in a higher effective nuclear charge. In contrast, as one moves down a group, the effective nuclear charge tends to decrease even though the number of protons in the nucleus is increasing. This is due to the addition of new energy levels with each successive period, leading to greater electron shielding. The inner electron shells partially shield the outer electrons from the full force of the positive charge in the nucleus, reducing the effective nuclear charge experienced by the outer electrons.

 

Atomic Radius Trends on the Periodic Table

Atomic size, or atomic radius, refers to the size of the atom. Generally, atomic size decreases moving from left to right across a period. This is because the number of protons is increasing in elements with the same energy level.  The greater nuclear charge exerts a stronger attraction on the electrons in the outermost energy level, pulling them closer to the nucleus and reducing the overall size of the atom.  Conversely, when moving down a group, the atomic radius tends to increase. This is because new energy levels are added with each successive period.  Additionally, the increased number of electron shells provides greater electron-electron repulsion, counteracting the attractive force of the nucleus and contributing to a larger atomic radius.

Trends in Ionization Energy

Ionization energy is a fundamental property of atoms that describes the energy required to remove an outer shell electron from an atom, turning it into a positively charged ion.  While there can be exceptions and variations based on specific elements and their electronic structures, when moving from left to right across a period, ionization energy generally increases. This can be attributed to the increasing effective nuclear charge as the number of protons in the nucleus rises. The greater positive charge exerts a stronger pull on the electrons in the outermost energy level, making it more difficult to remove an electron and, consequently, increasing the ionization energy. Conversely, when moving down a group, ionization energy tends to decrease. This is due to the addition of new energy levels as one descends the group, leading to greater distance between the outer electrons and the nucleus. Additionally, the increased number of electron shells contributes to greater electron shielding, reducing the effective nuclear charge experienced by the outer electrons and making them easier to remove.

Electronegativity Trends

Electronegativity is a measure of an atom's ability to attract electrons in a chemical bond.  Like ionization energy, electronegativity generally increases across a period, and up a group.  In other words, as the atomic size decreases and the nuclear charge increases, atoms become more electronegative.  Higher higher positive charges enhance the nucleus's ability to attract and hold onto electrons in the outermost energy level, resulting in higher electronegativity values. In contrast, when moving down a group, electronegativity tends to decrease. This is because new energy levels are added with each successive period, causing the outer electrons to be farther from the nucleus. Additionally, the increased number of electron shells provides greater electron shielding, reducing the effective nuclear charge experienced by the outer electrons. Consequently, atoms lower in a group are less effective at attracting and holding onto electrons, leading to lower electronegativity values.

 

Trends in Electron Affinity on the Periodic Table

Electron affinity is a measure of the tendency of an atom to accept an additional electron and form a negative ion. Generally, electron affinity tends to increase from left to right across a period on the periodic table. As one moves from left to right, the atomic number increases, leading to an increase in the effective nuclear charge. The higher effective nuclear charge exerts a stronger pull on the electrons in the outermost energy level, making it more favorable for the atom to accept an additional electron and achieve a more stable, noble gas electron configuration. Elements on the right side of the periodic table, particularly the nonmetals, often have higher electron affinities. When moving down a group, electron affinity generally decreases. This is because the outer electrons are farther from the nucleus and experience weaker attractive forces. Certain elements may deviate from expected patterns of electron affinity  based on their specific electronic configurations. Nonetheless, understanding the general trends helps determine the likelihood of an atom accepting an extra electron and contributes to our comprehension of chemical reactivity and the formation of ions.

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